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Month: June 2018

Looking for guidance on WCAG 2.1? Check out the free CFA resource

The Centre For Accessibility, a joint initiative by DADAA, Media On Mars and myself, launched last week with a free online resource designed to support mainstream organisations with their digital access needs. To ensure the resource remains current and effective, the content has been updated to support both the WCAG 2.0 and WCAG 2.1 standards to the Level AA conformance target.

Screenshot of the Centre For Accessibility resource

The resource has been created based on the following categories:

The resource was funded in part by an ILC Linkage grant. Further information on the initiative can be found at the Centre For Accessibility website.

Centre For Accessibility launches with great community support

The Centre For Accessibility (CFA), an initiative created in partnership with DADAA, Media On Mars and myself, launched on 6 June 2018 at a community event hosted by DADAA in Fremantle.

Crowd at CFA launch

The breakfast event was well attended with 140 people coming along to join in the launch celebrations. Hosted by DADAA CEO David Doyle, the event initially featured a reflective and entertaining Welcome to Country by Oldman Walley followed by a video highlighting how accessibility issues affect people with disability. One particularly great line was ‘if you want my cash, make it accessible’.

CFA-Minister speaking with attendees

The importance of digital access continued as the Centre was launched by the Hon. Stephen Dawson MLC, Minister for Environment and Disability Services. The Minister spoke warmly about the need for accessibility, how mainstream organisations can improve independence by making content accessible and acknowledged the grant funding that led to the creation of the Centre.

Helen Errington

The proceedings continued with guest speaker Helen Errington who spoke both passionately and frankly about the challenges people with disability can face in their pursuit of access. This included the importance of mainstream organisations needing to fix access issues so that everyone regardless of disability can participate in society and complete everyday tasks.

Scott speaking with attendees

My presentation was the final part of formal proceedings, launching the official CFA resource which I developed. that features information on how people with disability access information, how content can be made accessible across different roles, guidance on the WCAG 2.0 and 2.1 standards and how existing content on websites and documents can be checked for accessibility issues.

With the Centre formally open, attention now turns to the delivery of three workshops across Western Australia to support mainstream organisations to incorporate accessibity into work practices.

The CFA has been funded in part by an ILC Linkage grant and its purpose of the CFA is to create an industry and not-for-profit collaboration that will work to promote digital access. Further information can be found at the Centre For Accessibility website.

Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.1 is now a W3C standard

The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) has announced the official release of theWeb Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.1 as a “W3C Recommendation web standard.

The release of WCAG 2.1 marks an important change in the way in which accessibility is considered and tested due to WCAG 2.1 focusing on providing support to the mobile web. The new standard includes everything contained in WCAG 2.0 plus additional guidelines and success criteria.

To support the WCAG 2.1 release, W3C has included a new resource titled  What’s New in WCAG 2.1  and a detailed blog post titled WCAG 2.1 is a W3C Recommendation.

Further information can be found in the full WCAG 2.1 standard.